Review: The Changing Face of Marketing summit
Editorial

Review: The Changing Face of Marketing summit

At CIM’s summit, The Changing Face of Marketing, delegates from across the industry gathered at the British Museum to hear leading experts discuss the key dynamics impacting on the profession today

The social and political backdrop of 2016 will impact marketing through 2017 

After a welcome from Chris Daly, chief executive of CIM, the day began with an address from Gemma Butler, associate director of marketing at the institute.

Gemma underlined that “the social and political backdrop of 2016 will continue to have a direct impact on marketing through 2017” and summarised the findings of CIM’s survey of marketers, The Challenges and Opportunities Facing Marketers in 2017. The report reveals 70% of marketers are concerned about external factors impacting the profession, including Brexit (55%) and the possibility of recession (47%).

 

Speakers take questions from the audience at the CIM Summit

Marketing is in the spotlight when it comes to GDPR

Gemma impressed on delegates how crucial it was to be prepared for the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), and noted that business face potential fines of up to €20m, or 4% of global turnover, if they flout the new rules. Since customers will need to give their explicit consent to allow data used for marketing purposes, this “absolutely puts marketing in the spotlight when it comes to GDPR.”

She added that in a time when data is driving decisions and technology is changing at pace, marketing has never had such a perfect opportunity to excel:

“Strategic marketing ... links the business all the way through to the business plan, champions customer engagement and drives organisations to improve their overall customer experience.”

Put the audience at the heart of what you do

Steve Forde, director of product and online marketing at ITV explained how detailed market orientation has been central to a recent revamping the ITV on-demand service. His team spent time with families across the UK to understand its audience’s real attitudes towards television viewing.

Steve Forde, director of product and online marketing at ITV

“We knew we had to put the audience at the heart of what we wanted to do,” he said. By using agile methodologies, and successfully managing HiPPOs (the highest paid person’s opinions), Steve’s work drove a 44% increase across all viewing metrics.

See Steve’s presentation here.

Ian Golding – of the Customer Experience Consultancy – cited Amazon as being master of customer-centric organisation and described the process of becoming customer-centric as like fitting pieces of a jigsaw together. Internal unity of focus, he said, was crucial to success:

“There has to be a shared desire to want to continuously improve the experience of your customers. Everyone in the business has to know what the customer journey looks like.”

See Ians presentation here.

Ian Golding of the Customer Experience Consultancy

Understanding customer needs to drive ROI

The increasing role of data and technology for marketers, and the need to understand the difference between a helpful tool from the latest gimmick, was also on the agenda.

Andrew Wise, head of customer success EMEA at Act-On, explained how automation helps to track customers’ “digital body language”, so marketers can “better educate them and help them to make an informed purchase.” He added: “It’s about understanding customer needs and combining that with technology to drive ROI.”

See Andrew’s presentation here.

Daniel Rowles, chief executive and trainer at Target Internet, advised marketers that data, especially from social media, can be sometimes misleading:

“You can try to measure engagement on Facebook by counting the comments underneath your posts. But [sometimes] what you’re actually seeing is bots talking to bots… none of that has any commercial value whatsoever,” he warned.

Daniel Rowles, chief executive and trainer at Target Internet

Daniel highlighted the power of the Google Analytics’ multichannel conversion visualiser, and explained how important it is to set primary online objectives.

See Daniel’s presentation here.

How can you get buy-in from the board?

In a question and answer session, Daniel also said that an agile approach is useful to secure and retain management buy-in for marketing projects, saving time in reaching a minimum viable product, and incorporating feedback sooner.

Jeremy Waite, evangelist at IBM, demonstrated the capabilities of IBM’s Watson artificial intelligence tool to optimise marketing communications and advised that marketers sometimes need to be stealthy in order to enact organisational change.

Marketers, he said, should also try to find “the moneyball metric” – the most pertinent statistic from all possible data streams – and present that to the board to get their approval.

Jeremy Waite, IBM Evangelist

Leigh Hopwood, CIM chair, captured the zeitgeist of the summit, concluding:

“It’s marketing’s time, we will have to further educate our organisations to promote the value of what we do as marketers.” 

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